The ebb and flow of a Vancouver Island writer's thoughts.
Follow your weirdness, as Annie Dillard would say. :)

Follow your weirdness, as Annie Dillard would say. :)

(via booksbeforebedtime)

girlsinthestacks:

We have several options for for those getting their books banned. 

Also, we made this video before we realized it was Banned Books Week, and not Banned Book Week. <der, there is more than one book getting banned>

girlsinthestacks:

Thank you so much to the fabulous Girls In The Stacks for hosting me today! I’m so excited to share the cover of FOLLOWING CHELSEA with you! This story’s journey from idea to published book has been a long and winding one (you can read about it HERE), but now, we’re thisclose!

FOLLOWING…

girlsinthestacks:

Thank you so much to the fabulous Girls In The Stacks for hosting me today! I’m so excited to share the cover of FOLLOWING CHELSEA with you! This story’s journey from idea to published book has been a long and winding one (you can read about it HERE), but now, we’re thisclose!

FOLLOWING…

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.
Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.
Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.
Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.
The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.

Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.

Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.

Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.

The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

(Source: explore-blog)

sharpegirl:

Far From You by Tess Sharpe Giveaway!
Hey y’all, I’m giving away two signed copies of FAR FROM YOU (with a few extras thrown in!). One copy will have my notes and thoughts about the book scribbled in the margins, and the second copy will contain a handwritten short story about what happens to the characters after FAR FROM YOU ends.
To enter, all you have to do is reblog this post, or tweet a link to the giveaway with the hashtag #farfromyou. This is an international Giveaway and it ends on Monday, April 21st and the winners will be announced on the 22nd! 

sharpegirl:

Far From You by Tess Sharpe Giveaway!

Hey y’all, I’m giving away two signed copies of FAR FROM YOU (with a few extras thrown in!). One copy will have my notes and thoughts about the book scribbled in the margins, and the second copy will contain a handwritten short story about what happens to the characters after FAR FROM YOU ends.

To enter, all you have to do is reblog this post, or tweet a link to the giveaway with the hashtag #farfromyou. This is an international Giveaway and it ends on Monday, April 21st and the winners will be announced on the 22nd! 

On heroes

This morning when I was running, Bonnie Tyler’s “Holding Out For a Hero” came on my iPod, and I thought I could definitely use a hero to swoop down and carry me the last bit of this seemed-like-a-good-idea-when-I-started 5k. But of course, there was no swooping, no carrying, and I realized once again that when I’m running toward a goal, be it fitness or writing or what have you, I need to be my own hero. (Bonnie, what were you thinking?!)

dedalvs:

gainesm:

ouyangdan:

crewdlydrawn:

allthingslinguistic:

hyperboreanhapocanthosaurus:

So you know what I don’t get? Why people repeat words. (x)

Grammar time: it’s called “contrastive reduplication,” and it’s a form of intensification that is relatively common. Finnish does a very similar thing, and others use near-reduplication (rhyme-based) to intensify, like Hungarian (pici ‘tiny’, ici-pici ‘very tiny’).

Even the typologically-distant group of Bantu languages utilize reduplication in a strikingly similar fashion with nouns: Kinande oku-gulu ‘leg’, oku-gulu-gulu ‘a REAL leg’ (Downing 2001, includes more with verbal reduplication as well).

I suppose the difficult aspect of English reduplication is not through this particular type, but the fact that it utilizes many other types of reduplication: baby talk (choo-choo, no-no), rhyming (teeny-weeny, super-duper), and the ever-famous “shm” reduplication: fancy-schmancy (a way of denying the claim that something is fancy).

screams my professor was trying to find an example of reduplication so the next class he came back and said “I FOUND REDUPLICATION IN ENGLISH” and then he said “Milk milk” and everyone was just “what?” and he said “you know when you go to a coffee shop and they ask if you want soy milk and you say ‘no i want milk milk’” and everyone just had this collective sigh of understanding.

Another name for this particular construction is contrastive focus reduplication, and there’s a famous linguistics paper about it which is commonly known as the Salad Salad Paper. You know, because if you want to make it clear that you’re not talking about pasta salad or potato salad, you might call it “salad salad”. The repetition indicates that you’re intending the most prototypical meaning of the word, like green salad or cow’s milk, even though other things can be considered types of salad or milk. 

Can I make love to this post?… Is that a thing that’s possible?

i just had a linguistgasm.

Okay Dedalvs, you know what you have to do.

What do you want me to do, reblog it? As a conlanger, I’m just a linguist, not a linguistlinguist.

(Source: gifmethat, via yahighway)

tmichaelmartin:

New video! “Top 5 Reasons ’80s Movies Are Awesome”

What makes Ferris Bueller and Marty McFly cooler than anyone in modern movies? Grab your hoverboard and let’s find out together. (Inspired by Swoozie.)

Reblogs appreeshed!

A playlist for my “magic beachy book”. :)

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