The ebb and flow of a Vancouver Island writer's thoughts.

On heroes

This morning when I was running, Bonnie Tyler’s “Holding Out For a Hero” came on my iPod, and I thought I could definitely use a hero to swoop down and carry me the last bit of this seemed-like-a-good-idea-when-I-started 5k. But of course, there was no swooping, no carrying, and I realized once again that when I’m running toward a goal, be it fitness or writing or what have you, I need to be my own hero. (Bonnie, what were you thinking?!)

dedalvs:

gainesm:

ouyangdan:

crewdlydrawn:

allthingslinguistic:

hyperboreanhapocanthosaurus:

So you know what I don’t get? Why people repeat words. (x)

Grammar time: it’s called “contrastive reduplication,” and it’s a form of intensification that is relatively common. Finnish does a very similar thing, and others use near-reduplication (rhyme-based) to intensify, like Hungarian (pici ‘tiny’, ici-pici ‘very tiny’).

Even the typologically-distant group of Bantu languages utilize reduplication in a strikingly similar fashion with nouns: Kinande oku-gulu ‘leg’, oku-gulu-gulu ‘a REAL leg’ (Downing 2001, includes more with verbal reduplication as well).

I suppose the difficult aspect of English reduplication is not through this particular type, but the fact that it utilizes many other types of reduplication: baby talk (choo-choo, no-no), rhyming (teeny-weeny, super-duper), and the ever-famous “shm” reduplication: fancy-schmancy (a way of denying the claim that something is fancy).

screams my professor was trying to find an example of reduplication so the next class he came back and said “I FOUND REDUPLICATION IN ENGLISH” and then he said “Milk milk” and everyone was just “what?” and he said “you know when you go to a coffee shop and they ask if you want soy milk and you say ‘no i want milk milk’” and everyone just had this collective sigh of understanding.

Another name for this particular construction is contrastive focus reduplication, and there’s a famous linguistics paper about it which is commonly known as the Salad Salad Paper. You know, because if you want to make it clear that you’re not talking about pasta salad or potato salad, you might call it “salad salad”. The repetition indicates that you’re intending the most prototypical meaning of the word, like green salad or cow’s milk, even though other things can be considered types of salad or milk. 

Can I make love to this post?… Is that a thing that’s possible?

i just had a linguistgasm.

Okay Dedalvs, you know what you have to do.

What do you want me to do, reblog it? As a conlanger, I’m just a linguist, not a linguistlinguist.

(Source: gifmethat, via yahighway)

tmichaelmartin:

New video! “Top 5 Reasons ’80s Movies Are Awesome”

What makes Ferris Bueller and Marty McFly cooler than anyone in modern movies? Grab your hoverboard and let’s find out together. (Inspired by Swoozie.)

Reblogs appreeshed!

A playlist for my “magic beachy book”. :)

And yet, by every criterion listed, children’s fiction is entirely capable of being great literature. Indeed, if you’re looking for writing that changes the reader and the world, there may be no better form….I’ve visited countless schools and seen for myself the life-changing power of children’s books. It’s impossible to overstate the transformative effects they can have upon individual readers – and collectively, across generations, upon the world.
Writing is mostly not letting your doubts overwhelm you.
-

A Writer’s Guide To Keeping Sane, a fine addition to our ongoing archive of wisdom on writing.

Pair with Anne Lamott on how perfectionism kills creativity

(via explore-blog)

(Source: , via explore-blog)

When I find a great gif to use here, then realize it’s got horrible punctuation.

authorlife:

image

susanadrian:

ktliterary:

Truth.

YES.

susanadrian:

ktliterary:

Truth.

YES.

(Source: dailydoseofstuf)

Yep…

aprilynnepike:

amandaonwriting:

The Process of Writing a Novel

I think I’m in the dark night of the soul right now …

Yep…

aprilynnepike:

amandaonwriting:

The Process of Writing a Novel

I think I’m in the dark night of the soul right now …

(via claudiagray)

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